Spherical Structure: Measure, Parameter, Boundary

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Hebrew Text


English Translation


Short Summary

The structure of the sefirot and the cosmic order -- the fundamental identity of each dimension, its form of expression and degree of energy, and its diminishment through the containers -- is shaped by the kav, which is rooted in the ten hidden sefirot.

Long Summary

[This chapter rounds out and concludes the discussion that began in chapter 29 explaining the three levels of the integrated energies].

The Zohar says that every sefirah has a measure (midah), a parameter (gevul) and a boundary (techum). The difference between the three: 1) Measure is the fundamental identity of each sefirah. 2) Parameter is the the sefirah's form of expression and degree of energy, revealed or diminished. 3) Boundary is the limit imposed on the energy by the container (diminishing its lower levels), allowing the emanation of the lower sefirot.

The kav ha'midah (measuring line) is the thread of energy that measures and defines all three dimensions of the sefirot -- its identity, parameter and boundary. This is due to the fact that the kav in its root contains ten sefirot -- the ten hidden sefirot. And via the tzimtzum the ten sefirot become distinct. Yet, they still remain in a relatively shapeless state (a line that contains a multitude of points), until the energy manifest in containers, where their identities become increasingly apparent as they assume substance and their defined structures.

This explains the verse Tzion b'mishpat te'podeh v'shoveoh b'tzedaka: The work in the structure (mishpat) allows us to reach beyond structure (tzion), and redeem the trappings (shoveoh) of the structure.

Glossary

  • energy
  • kav
  • structure
  • parameters
  • boundaries
  • hierarchy
  • sefirot
  • ohr pnimi
  • tzion
  • sign
  • torah
  • mitzvot

Concepts

Spherical Structure. The Kav.

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Analysis/Compendium


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Points to Consider